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Take your Music to the Next Level With Proper Sound Studios

Mastering lets you share your music the way it's meant to be heard with consistent, professional sound across different devices and streaming platforms.

With Proper Sound Studios, that process is always fast, easy and affordable with instant, professional results every time. Try it for yourself and deliver your best sound.

 

What is Mastering?

Music mastering is the final step in the recording process. During mastering, additional audio treatments such as; Volume leveling, Compression, Stereo Field & Harmonic enhancements are applied to your Final Audio file to correct problem frequencies and enhance the Audio overall. Mastering should not be confused with simply adding signal processing or effects to your Master fader during the Recording / Mixing Process. Additionally to adding enhancements to your Audio file, Mastering is also the processes of enhancing or correcting multiple tracks (i.e. album of songs) to the same dynamic range, Stereo Field range and similar or equivalent harmonic enhancements.

(Mastering multiple songs to each other)

Since magnetic tape replaced straight-to-lathe cutting in the late 1940s, audio mastering has become its own artform. But many in the music industry still see it as dark magic. Before we pull back the veil on this mystery, let’s define an important term.

An “audio master” is the final version of a song that’s prepared for sale, download, streaming, radio play, or any other form of mass consumption by listeners.

The audio master is what is used to make all future copies of the recording. It’s what is pressed on vinyl or burned to CD, and what digital services like Apple Music and Spotify use to encode the files of your music they make available. When you listen to a song via streaming, download or physical format, you’re listening to a copy of the master audio.

Audio Mastering Service

What's the Difference Between Mixing and Mastering?

Mixing and mastering are both stages in the production process, and even share some of the same techniques and tools—but there is one key difference.

Mixing focuses on enhancing each of the individual tracks in a session and combining them into one cohesive mix. Each of the elements should be clearly audible, and work together with the other elements to create a balanced sound.

Mastering focuses on enhancing the final mix and preparing it for distribution. Instead of working with multiple tracks, you work with the final "two-track" mix to add the finishing touches and make it sound as good as possible—kind of like a coat of polish after a good cleaning.

Sound_Mastering_3d.jpg

What's the Difference Between Mixing and Mastering?

Mixing and mastering are both stages in the production process, and even share some of the same techniques and tools—but there is one key difference.

Mixing focuses on enhancing each of the individual tracks in a session and combining them into one cohesive mix. Each of the elements should be clearly audible, and work together with the other elements to create a balanced sound.

Mastering focuses on enhancing the final mix and preparing it for distribution. Instead of working with multiple tracks, you work with the final "two-track" "Stereo" mix to add the finishing touches and make it sound as good as possible—kind of like a coat of polish after a good cleaning.

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The Importance Of Mastering

Mastering is one of the most important steps in the production process, as it ensures that your music will sound its best on different streaming platforms, media formats and devices.

In addition to making sure all of the files are in the appropriate formats, mastering engineers are also typically responsible for sequencing and spacing the songs on an album, meaning they make sure all of the songs play back in the right order and have a natural, consistent flow.

Mastering typically starts with removing any technical issues in the recording. Any clicks or pops caused by bad edits need to go, and any hiss or noise needs to be removed. It's crucial that you stamp out these issues early on, as they'll only become more noticeable when you increase the loudness of the mix later on.

Another important aspect of mastering is frequency balancing. Mastering engineers use EQ to adjust the frequency response of a mix to make sure that each element is clearly audible, and that the mix is even and balanced. If there is too much or not enough of one frequency range, it can throw the whole mix out of whack.

Mastering engineers use compressors and other dynamics processors to enhance the dynamics of a mix as well. It's common to use fast peak limiting to give transients an aggressive, punchy sound, while using a slower, gentler device to glue all of the elements together with mix bus compression.

It's also common for mastering engineers to use stereo enhancers to make a mix sound bigger and wider. This can help tighten up the stereo image by focusing the low-end in the center of the mix.